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Cinsault

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      All about cinsault

      What is cinsault wine?

      Cinsault vines grow well in hot, dry conditions and offer prolific yields. Although the fourth-most planted varietal in southwestern France, it's mainly used in blended wine and less frequently bottled as cinsault. The early-ripening, dark-skinned grapes have a strong aroma and fruity taste. While naturally capable of producing a harvest of several tons of grapes per acre, the grapes have improved flavor and character if vintners actively manage growing conditions to produce lower yields. A factor in favor of cinsault vines is their good resistance to fungal and other grapevine diseases.

      Cinsault rosé wines

      Rosé wines produced from cinsault grapes often have a strong strawberry or perfume aroma and fruity flavor. These wines are naturally dry and crisp. A good example of this form of wine is The Palm by Whispering Angel rosé with an aromatic fresh nose and a subtle fruity taste. Usually served slightly chilled, cinsault rosé wines combine the character of red wines with the lightness of a good white wine.

      Cinsault red wines

      Cinsault red wine has slightly more body and character than its rosé counterpart. Still, red wines produced from cinsault grapes have low tannins and a soft smooth taste. Cinsault wine is best served young and does not age well. Wines produced from cinsault vines grown in marginal soils, such as those found in Lebanon, South Africa and Morocco, often exhibit more character and flavor than those from well-watered areas.

      Cinsault food pairing

      Cinsault wine complements many different foods. Like carménère wines, it goes well with braised and roasted beef, pork and chicken. Its slightly smoky flavor also pairs nicely with duck, lamb and goat. Traditionally, cinsault was often paired with sea snails and garlic, although it also goes well with French Mediterranean foods like olives, cheeses, pasta and vegetable stew like ratatouille.

      Shop Drizly for your favorite red and rosé wines. Click these handy links to search for Drizly in your city and look for liquor stores on Drizly near you.

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