All About Lager

It's often love at first sip. Your first beer was almost undoubtedly a lager, mostly because they're everywhere. You'll find a local lager in bar, pub, and corner store in the world — as well you should. This crisp, easy-drinking beer can be nuanced and flavorful. It's also incredibly easy to find lagers that are light on your wallet and lighter on flavor. But having traveled the globe after being created in Germany centuries ago, lager beer can vary greatly in strength, color and flavor.

Some of the most popular brand names in the world, from Bud to Coors, are lagers. When you're craving a Corona or desperate for Dos Equis, you're dreaming of a lager, and who could blame you? Lagers satisfy the palate easily thanks to their simple flavors and low alcohol by volume.

If you like lagers, try a few brands you've never had before. Extend your knowledge beyond Michelob Ultra and try the caramel notes in a Yuengling Lager, the crisp Narragansett Lager or the hearty Lone Star Lager.

How To Serve It:

Light-bodied lager tastes best served cold, between 40 and 45 degrees Fahrenheit. If you prefer medium- to full-body lagers, go with a slightly warmer temperature. Drink your lager straight out of the bottle or can if you don't have any glassware handy, though you'll get a nice head if you pour it into a classic pilsner glass.

Lager Versus Pilsner:

Lagers and ales are the two most common types of beer. While pilsner often stands out as its own separate category, it's actually a type of lager. Denizens of the Czech Republic designed pilsners during the Austro-Hungarian Empire as a lighter version of the traditional lager. Pilsner tends to look more like an ale thanks to its color, but it's also heavy on the hops and combines floral and spicy notes to create a delicious concoction.

Believe it or not, pilsner arose because mass quantities of lager had to be sacrificed due to age. Nobody wanted to drink spoiled beer. Pilsner incorporates Saz hops, which makes the beer last longer and stay flavorful no matter how it's stored. We don't recommend leaving your pilsner open on the kitchen table for two months, but you can trust pilsner to deliver great results every time you pop the cap off a longneck or thumb open an aluminum can.